Heritage in Space

An Overview

HENSOLDT‘s space heritage dates back more than half a century. With a camera on board the Apollo 11 lunar module as it landed on the moon, HENSOLDT had its optics in space for the first time in 1969 – then under the Carl Zeiss brand. In the meantime, these highly specialised engineers have found a new home at HENSOLDT.

The German sensor solutions house strengthens its space domain by combining its legacy of innovative space optics with high-end space-borne radar instruments. Since the 1990s, HENSOLDT’s space electronics team has supplied key technologies and core electronics for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites. HENSOLDT’s SAR solutions have been in operation for more than 20 years without mission critical failure.

 

1962

First Zeiss lens in Space

NASA

During Mission Mercury-Atlas 8 in October 1962, astronaut Walter Schirra used a Swedish Hasselblad medium format camera with a German Zeiss lens during his flight. Since then, the Hasselblad cameras with Zeiss lenses have been "space qualified" and have been used time and again in space missions

1969

Apollo 11

NASA

Wide-angle lens for photos of the moon surface during man’s first lunar landing.

1972

Apollo 16

NASA

Lens for ultraviolet photography of Earth and Moon

1972

Apollo 17

NASA

Lenses for panorama shots of the moon landscape

2000

Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)

DLR

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provided by DLR for NASA’s SRT mission: Images taken to generate the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth

2006

MetOp

EUMETSAT

With higher image resolution and a measurement of temperature and humidity distribution with unprecedented accuracy, MetOp helps to extend the reliable weather prediction interval from three to five days.

Picture: Copyright {2019} EUMETSAT

2007

TerraSAR-X

DLR/ Airbus Defence and Space

Radar sensor for the German earth observation satellite: The mission’s objectives are to provide high-quality SAR (Synthetic-Aperture-Radar) data in the X-band for research and development as well as for scientific and commercial applications.

2010

TanDEM-X

DLR

The satellite is almost identical to TerraSAR-X, with the aim toproduce a highly accurate, three-dimensional image of our Earth with uniform quality and unprecedented accuracy to create the Global Digital Elevation Model (DEM).

2013

Gaia

ESA

The mission aims to construct the most extensive 3D space catalog ever made, of stars, planets, comets and asteroids. HENSOLDT mirrors combine the incoming light beams.

2018

PAZ

Hisdesat

PAZ is an X-band SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) spacecraft based on the TerraSAR-X platform for a civil/military dual-use mission.

2020

KOMPSat-6

Korea Aerospace Research Institute

The primary mission of the KOMPSAT-6 system is to provide the SAR imagery of 0.5 m and 1 m resolution in the high resolution mode, 3 m resolution in standard mode, and 20 m resolution in the wide swath mode at an incidence angle of 45°.

2020

Environmental Mapping and Analysis Programme

DLR

EnMAP is a German hyperspectral satellite mission for Earth observation. Imaging spectrometers measure the solar radiation reflected from the Earth's surface from visible light to short-wave infrared.

2021

TanDEM-L

DLR

Proposed interferometric L-Band SAR mission for biomass cartography, earthquake prediction, soil humidity sensing, and glaciology.

2021

James Webb Space Telescope

NASA/ESA/CSA/STSI

The JWST will enable better observation and understanding of the structure and evolution of the first galaxies, the formation of stars and planets, and direct imaging of exoplanets and novas.

2022

BepiColombo

DLR

The BepiColombo laser altimeters are primarily used to measure and create an elevation model of Mercury.

2024

JUICE

ESA/ESTEC

JUICE will spend at least three years making detailed observations of the giant gaseous planet Jupiter and in-depth studies of three of its icy moons Ganymede, Europa and Callisto.